Tag Archives: dietitianapproved

Cauliflower lentil curry (or soup)

 

Are you looking to improve your plant based eating? Dietitian’s TIP 👉 Adding lentils is a simple way to boost plant protein. Here is adding a half a cup of red lentils to cauliflower curry. Instead of curry you can just use a veggie broth for a wonderful cauliflower soup. Shout out to me with your plant-based eating question!  I’m ready to support you with our new personalized nutrition coaching program!

Brief video download of cauliflower lentil curry recipe in progress

Recipe cauliflower & red lentils

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp olive oil
1 medium onion diced
2 cloves garlic minced
1 tbsp ginger minced
2-3 TBsp curry powder**
1/2 cup red lentils rinsed & drained
5 cups cauliflower chopped
1.5 cups water
1 400ml can coconut milk **
1/4 cup cilantro or parsley chopped

** soup variation
⁃ omit curry powder
⁃ Omit coconut milk & use veggie broth instead

Method:

1. In a large pot heat up olive oil sautée onion and garlic for 5 min
2. Add ginger & curry powder cook for 3 min
3. Add cauliflower, lentils, water & coconut milk. Mix well & cook for 20 min
4. Serve & top w cilantro or parsley & Enjoy.

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Do you have questions about good nutrition and healthy eating? Connect with us! We offer expert personalized sessions to help you simplify eating and leverage the benefits of credible nutrition science with professional support. As dietitians we love food and look beyond the fads and gimmicks to support you in your health goals. We unlock the power of food and deliver reliable, life-changing advice.

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(NOTE: Registered Dietitian led Nutrition Counselling sessions are covered by many employee and private health insurance plans. Check with your plan provider for details on coverage for the cost of a Registered Dietitian / Nutritionist Services.)

Brussels Sprouts and Carrot Bake


Image Source: Foodland Ontario

A hearty side dish of wholesome brussels sprouts and carrots in a honey mustard glaze topped with nuts and optional cheese.  Recipe inspired by Foodland Ontario and modified by Registered Dietitian and professional Home Economist to suit vegetarian and vegan dietary preferences.

6 servings (190 g per serving)

Ingredients

  • 1.5 lb (680 g) Brussels sprouts, trimmed
  • 2 large (150 g) carrots chopped
  • 1 large (150 g) onion, chopped
  • 1/4 tsp (1 mL) hot pepper flakes (optional)
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) Honey
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) Dijon mustard
  • Pinch each pepper and salt (optional)
  • 2/3 cup (70 g) walnuts, chopped
  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) grated Swiss or Mozzarella cheese (optional – omit for Vegan version)

Method

  1. Trim Brussels sprouts & wash well. Cut carrots into 1-inch (2.5 cm) pieces.
  2. In a large oven proof pot of simmering water, cook Brussels sprouts and carrots for 3-5 minutes or until desired tenderness. Drain well and set aside.
  3. Chop onion.
  4. To the pot, add 1 tsp vegetable oil and sautee onions till softened and very light golden brown – about 5 minutes.
  5. Stir in honey, mustard, pepper and salt (if using)
  6. Add reserved Brussels sprouts and carrots; toss to coat well.
  7. Sprinkle with chopped walnuts and grated cheese (if using). Bake on middle rack of 400°F (200°C) oven for 3 minutes or until cheese is melted.

Cooking Tip: If skillet handle is not heat resistant, wrap in foil.

Nutrition Facts* per serving (190 g)

Calories: 180
Fat: 10 grams
Carbohydrates: 19 grams
Protein: 8 grams
Source of 21 vitamins and minerals.

*Nutrition Facts provided using professional recipe software analysis.

Body Weight Words Matter!  Reflecting on the New Canadian Adult Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines

For most people their body weight is a personal issue. However people living in larger bodies face hurtful stigma including language surrounding obesity and overweight.  Developed by Obesity Canada and the Canadian Association of Bariatric Physicians and Surgeons, the new Canadian Adult Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines represent the first comprehensive update in Canadian obesity guidelines since 2007.[1]

Decades of research in behavioral and nutrition science suggest that it’s time to update our clinical approach and recognize that some patterns of communication about body weight are more helpful than others. Registered dietitians are deeply involved in this discussion and here are some of the topline messages from leading experts that stood out to us:

  1. Body Mass Index (BMI) is NOT an accurate tool for identifying obesity related complications [2]
    BMI is a widely used tool for screening and classifying body weight but it’s been controversial for decades.  A person’s BMI number is generated by considering their height in relation to their weight and it tells us about the size of the person’s body.  Experts now agree that more information than BMI is needed to determine whether a person is sick or healthy.
  2. Patient-centered, weight-inclusive care focuses on health outcomes rather than weight loss1,2
    Remember to ask permission before discussing body weight and respect the person’s answer. Health issues are measured by lab data and clinical signs. These can include blood pressure, blood sugar or reduced mobility. Shift the focus toward addressing impairments to health rather than weight loss alone.
  3. Obesity is NOT simply a matter of self-control and the ‘eat less, move more’ advice is insufficient
    The effects of a dieting lifestyle are burdensome. Evidence-based advice must move beyond simplistic approaches of ‘eat less and move more’. For example, in recent years researchers gained a better understanding of clinical evidence and body weight biology. These include the amount of food energy absorbed through the gut, the brain’s role in appetite regulation and the thermic effect of eating.[3] Environmental factors such as where people live, work and food availably also have an influence on body weight.
  4. People of higher weights should have access to evidence informed interventions, including medical nutrition therapy
    There is a lot of misinformation about body weight so evidence-based health management is key. One of the recommended interventions is to include personalized counselling by a registered dietitian with a focus on healthy food choices and evidence-based nutrition therapy.
  5. Recognize and address weight bias and stigma
    People with excess body weight experience weight bias and stigma. Weight bias is defined as negative weight–related attitudes, beliefs and judgements toward people who are of higher weight. This thinking can result in stigma which is acting on weight-based beliefs such as teasing, bullying, macroaggressions, social rejection and discrimination towards people living in larger bodies. People may also internalize weight stigma and criticize themselves or others based on body weight.

Experts consider that changes to language can alleviate the stigma of obesity within the health-care system and support improved outcomes for both people living in a larger body and for the health-care system.3,[4],[5],[6] In our Body Weight Words Matter!  chart below we provide several examples of communication interventions to help assess your attitude and reduce body weight bias.

Click here to download your copy of Body Weight Words Matter INFOGRAPHIC

Do you have questions about good nutrition and healthy eating? Connect with us! We offer expert personalized sessions to help you simplify eating and leverage the benefits of credible nutrition science. As dietitians we love food and look beyond the fads and gimmicks to deliver reliable, life-changing advice.

Contact us directly or complete this Nutrition Counselling Registration Form for your individualized nutrition coaching appointments in a virtual format.

[1] Obesity Canada (2020) Canadian Adult Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) https://obesitycanada.ca/guidelines/References:

[2] Obesity Canada (2020) CMAJ Obesity in adults: a clinical practice guideline https://www.cmaj.ca/content/cmaj/192/31/E875.full.pdf

[3]   Rubino et al. (2020) Joint international consensus statement for ending stigma of obesity. Nature Medicine  www.nature.com/medicine

[4] Obesity UK (2020) Language Matters: Obesity https://cdn.easo.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/31073423/Obesity-Language-Matters-_FINAL.pdf

[5] Puhl, R. et.al (2016) Cross-national perspectives about weight-based bullying in youth: nature, extent and remedies. Pediatric Obesity,

[6] Puhl R., Peterson J. L., Luedicke J. (2013). Motivating or stigmatizing? Public perceptions of weight-related language used by health providers. Int. J. Obes.  https://www.nature.com/articles/ijo2012110

Are you ready for virtual nutrition coaching appointments? We are open and ready to help!

Are you tired of food myths and ready for a positive change? Check out our dietitians’ blogs and recipes on this website to empower your healthy eating.

And, yes HANGRY is a real word. You may have seen hangry people who are ‘bad-tempered or irritable as a result of hunger’. Kids may also get hangry when they miss a meal.

Do you have questions about good nutrition and healthy eating? Shout out to us! We offer expert personalized sessions to help you simplify eating and keep ‘hangry’ away.

Contact us directly for your individualized nutrition coaching appointments in a virtual format. You can register at this link or Email:  Lucia@WeilerNutrition.com

Follow us on Instagram / Twitter @LuciaWeilerRD   LinkedIn 

 

 

Healthy eating on a budget

We heard from people who find it challenging to eat healthy on a budget. It’s such a great question and many folks, especially students, want to eat well and struggle with where to start.  Some of you may feel that you have no choice but to buy more expensive processed foods because you believe you can’t afford good nutrition.  There are many ways you can stretch your food dollar without sacrificing your health. Here are just FIVE tips to help you get started with making the most of your food dollar and eat well.

  1. Plan your meals
    Planning menus ahead lets you buy just what you need and stay on budget. It’s also a good way to avoid wasted food and help you lower you food costs. Planning reduces the time and stress of unplanned shopping trips and last minute dilemmas ‘what’s for dinner’. Before you go shopping think about what foods you’d like to eat/prepare. Know your food budget and adjust your menus as needed.
  2. Prepare a shopping list.
    Studies show that keeping a running grocery list is a great way to stay on track – it jogs your memory, saves money at the store, saves time too. It also keeps you from buying what you don’t need. Bottom line: Write a list and STICK TO IT.
    During Covid 19 many people prefer a paper list so they don’t have to handle their phones in the grocery store. When you prepare your list organize the items you need by category to match the store layout – for example, produce for veg and fruit, dairy, meat, bakery , frozen and grocery. We created this terrific Be Well Efficient shopping list that you can download from our website to help create your shopping list. Clicking on this link and then the image for your copy of the Be Well! Efficient Grocery Shopping List by L.Weiler RD
  3. Stock up on healthy staples that are on sale.
    Check for grocery store deals. Look for healthy food items on sale – fresh or frozen vegetables, fruit, canned beans, canned fish and meats and poultry. Dried foods are also budget friendly like dried beans, pasta, rice and oatmeal & they keep for a long time. If you like quiona buy it on SALE. Take advantage of local / seasonal produce. The price may be lower depending on where you shop. Fruits and vegetables are frozen at their peak of freshness so they are just as nutritious as fresh. You can easily add frozen or canned veggies to main dishes like casseroles and stews. You can also use frozen fruits in oatmeal, yogurt, baking and smoothies. Great choices include any dark green or orange like edamame (which are soybeans that boost protein content), peas and carrots or dark coloured berries.
  4. Cook once eat twice.
    Plan meals to make more than what you need today and enjoy the leftovers in another meal the next day. Cook extra whole grains like quinoa or barley for dinner and make a salad bowl recipe for lunch. If you eat meat and find lean cuts on sale consider buying a bit extra, roasting it and then incorporate it into another meal later. Look for recipes from Registered Dietitians that give you tips for using leftovers in your next meal.
  5. Store food properly
    Which uneaten food do you throw out most often?  Did you know that the most wasted foods in Canadian households are vegetables (30%), fruit (15%), and leftovers (13%) of total waste. So if you toss vegetables and fruit or leftovers in the trash then you’re like many Canadians. By eating the food you buy and storing it properly you will save money and reduce waste. If you find it challenging to be mindful of food storage here are some tips you could consider:
    • Butternut squash and sweet potatoes are excellent sources of the antioxidant beta carotene. They’ll last for at least two weeks.
    • Leafy greens tend to wilt within a week. So, shop and plan your menu accordingly.
    • Apples spoil 10 times faster in the fruit bowl than in the fridge.
    • Potatoes like a cool, dark spot so they don’t soften and sprout.
    • Keep cooked food in the fridge for 3-4 days and if you can’t eat it, freeze it for later use.

Visit our website for more tips and insights. Follow us on IG! @LuciaWeilerRD @Nutrition4NonNutritionists

N4NN ONLINE training services

Nutrition for NON-Nutritionists™ (n4nn) is a leader in nutrition training communications internationally. Since 2007, the course has supported 100’s of food and beverage professionals across Canada to communicate about nutrition issues with more confidence.

Co-Founders Lucia Weiler and Sue Mah design engaging educational courses specifically to help your business leverage the growing consumer interest in nutrition and healthy foods.

  • Developed by experienced adult educators leveraging best practice learning solutions and a variety of mediums including e-learning, virtual facilitation, and blended learning
  • Delivered and facilitated online by dietitian experts N4NN is a perfect fit to your small to mid-sized training programs
  • Contact us to help your team continue to learn, grow and innovate in a mature, professional learning environment

Oven Baked Pasta

Melt in your mouth and full of veggies this oven baked pasta full is the comfort food of the day.  Inspired by a fave cookbook from Chef David Rocco, but veggie boosted to become a #dietitanapproved recipe. Here is how I made it:
👉INGREDIENTS
  • 1/2 lb (250g) rigatoni pasta ;
  • 3 tbsp (45 mL)  olive oil,
  • 1 large eggplant cut in small cubes ,
  • 1 leek sliced, 1 cup frozen spinach (150g) ;
  • 15 each – black olives & sundried tomatoes chopped,
  • 1 bottle (675 ml) tomato purée,
  • 1/2 lb (250 g) mozzarella cheese grated.
  • Hot pepper flakes (optional)

👉METHOD

  1. Cook pasta according to package direction (reserve 1/2 cup pasta water).
  2. In a pot heat olive oil, sautée leek, garlic; add eggplant & spinach cook for 10 min. Add tomato purée & cheese. (Rinse purée bottle w reserved pasta water & add to pot) Mix in cooked pasta & transfer the whole mixture to a shallow baking dish.
  3. Bake 20 min @ 400F.

    Serves 6. What’s your favourite pasta dish? #morethanfood #dietitiansarekey #cook #familymeals

Be Well! Navigating the grocery aisles efficiently during COVID19

Getting in and out of a grocery store fast is more important than ever during the COVID19 pandemic. Health experts ask us to stay at home as much as possible which means limiting the number of shopping trips to a minimum. Once you arrive at the grocery store keeping a safe 6 foot distance from others is a new skill for many people including myself. It’s also important to navigate the aisles efficiently. Somehow it doesn’t seem OK any more to forget something and have to run back through the store to find it.

To help you stay well I created an efficient grocery shopping list. I really like this template because it prompts meal planning so you buy only what you need. I also limited the number of items to make your trip more manageable.   You’ll notice the list is organized in categories that follow the grocery store layout to help you get in and out of the store fast.

Here is how you can use it:

  1. Create a meal plan.
    Before going to the grocery store consider the meals you’d like to make in the upcoming week. Make a note of the most important items you need in case your trip is stressful and you don’t get through your whole shopping list.
  2. Complete your efficient grocery shopping list *
    Print out a copy of the Be Well! Efficient grocery shopping list and keep it in your kitchen. You can ask others you live with to help complete the list so everyone contributes to the eating plan. When the list gets full, you’ll know it’s time to go shopping.
  3. Navigate the aisles efficiently
    When you arrive at the store pick the aisles with the least number of people and keep your physical distance 6 feet from others. Make your way through the store quickly and efficiently. Because your shopping list is short you won’t need a pen to check off the list.

Keep well and good luck grocery shopping!

* Print off your copy of the shopping list by clicking on this link and then the image. Be Well! Efficient Grocery Shopping List by L.Weiler RD

Watch my one minute VIDEO summary and tips on efficient grocery shopping here:

Purple Cabbage & Potato Curry (Aloo Gobi)

  

Aloo Gobi is a classic Indian dish of potatoes and cauliflower. In this Canadian version inspired by Anita Stewart we swap in cabbage instead of cauliflower, but both can be called gobi!  Since I had purple cabbage on hand that’s what I used but any cabbage will do.  Either way it’s a one pot, super simple, comforting dish that’s full of flavour and ready in 30 minutes flat.  Serve it as a side dish with a slice of lean meat, chicken, fish or tofu. Scroll on for step by step on how to make it.

Ingredients:

Spice mixture: 

  • 1 tsp (5 mL) cumin
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) garam masala
  • ½ tsp ( 2mL) mustard seed (optional)
  • ½ tsp (2 mL) tumeric
  • ½ tsp (2 mL) cayenne pepper or hot pepper flakes

Veggies:

  • 2 tbsp (30 mL) vegetable oil
  • 1 medium cooking onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 4 cups (1L) potato cubed
  • 4 cups (1L) shredded cabbage
  • 1 tbsp (15mL) fresh ginger, grated
  • 1 cup (250 mL) water
  • Black pepper (ground)

Method:

  1. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onions and garlic and cook until fragrant for a few minutes.
  2. Add the spice mixture (cumin, garam masala, mustard seed, turmeric, and cayenne and cook until toasted, 1 minute more. )
  3. Add potatoes, ginger, cabbage and water.  Season with ground black pepper and pinch of salt to taste.
     
  4. Reduce heat and cook, covered, until potatoes and cabbage are tender, 15 minutes.
  5. Enjoy  with a slice of lean meat, chicken, fish or tofu.