Body Weight Words Matter!  Reflecting on the New Canadian Adult Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines

For most people their body weight is a personal issue. However people living in larger bodies face hurtful stigma including language surrounding obesity and overweight.  Developed by Obesity Canada and the Canadian Association of Bariatric Physicians and Surgeons, the new Canadian Adult Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines represent the first comprehensive update in Canadian obesity guidelines since 2007.[1]

Decades of research in behavioral and nutrition science suggest that it’s time to update our clinical approach and recognize that some patterns of communication about body weight are more helpful than others. Registered dietitians are deeply involved in this discussion and here are some of the topline messages from leading experts that stood out to us:

  1. Body Mass Index (BMI) is NOT an accurate tool for identifying obesity related complications [2]
    BMI is a widely used tool for screening and classifying body weight but it’s been controversial for decades.  A person’s BMI number is generated by considering their height in relation to their weight and it tells us about the size of the person’s body.  Experts now agree that more information than BMI is needed to determine whether a person is sick or healthy.
  2. Patient-centered, weight-inclusive care focuses on health outcomes rather than weight loss1,2
    Remember to ask permission before discussing body weight and respect the person’s answer. Health issues are measured by lab data and clinical signs. These can include blood pressure, blood sugar or reduced mobility. Shift the focus toward addressing impairments to health rather than weight loss alone.
  3. Obesity is NOT simply a matter of self-control and the ‘eat less, move more’ advice is insufficient
    The effects of a dieting lifestyle are burdensome. Evidence-based advice must move beyond simplistic approaches of ‘eat less and move more’. For example, in recent years researchers gained a better understanding of clinical evidence and body weight biology. These include the amount of food energy absorbed through the gut, the brain’s role in appetite regulation and the thermic effect of eating.[3] Environmental factors such as where people live, work and food availably also have an influence on body weight.
  4. People of higher weights should have access to evidence informed interventions, including medical nutrition therapy
    There is a lot of misinformation about body weight so evidence-based health management is key. One of the recommended interventions is to include personalized counselling by a registered dietitian with a focus on healthy food choices and evidence-based nutrition therapy.
  5. Recognize and address weight bias and stigma
    People with excess body weight experience weight bias and stigma. Weight bias is defined as negative weight–related attitudes, beliefs and judgements toward people who are of higher weight. This thinking can result in stigma which is acting on weight-based beliefs such as teasing, bullying, macroaggressions, social rejection and discrimination towards people living in larger bodies. People may also internalize weight stigma and criticize themselves or others based on body weight.

Experts consider that changes to language can alleviate the stigma of obesity within the health-care system and support improved outcomes for both people living in a larger body and for the health-care system.3,[4],[5],[6] In our Body Weight Words Matter!  chart below we provide several examples of communication interventions to help assess your attitude and reduce body weight bias.

Click here to download your copy of Body Weight Words Matter INFOGRAPHIC

Do you have questions about good nutrition and healthy eating? Connect with us! We offer expert personalized sessions to help you simplify eating and leverage the benefits of credible nutrition science. As dietitians we love food and look beyond the fads and gimmicks to deliver reliable, life-changing advice.

Contact us directly or complete this Nutrition Counselling Registration Form for your individualized nutrition coaching appointments in a virtual format.

[1] Obesity Canada (2020) Canadian Adult Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) https://obesitycanada.ca/guidelines/References:

[2] Obesity Canada (2020) CMAJ Obesity in adults: a clinical practice guideline https://www.cmaj.ca/content/cmaj/192/31/E875.full.pdf

[3]   Rubino et al. (2020) Joint international consensus statement for ending stigma of obesity. Nature Medicine  www.nature.com/medicine

[4] Obesity UK (2020) Language Matters: Obesity https://cdn.easo.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/31073423/Obesity-Language-Matters-_FINAL.pdf

[5] Puhl, R. et.al (2016) Cross-national perspectives about weight-based bullying in youth: nature, extent and remedies. Pediatric Obesity,

[6] Puhl R., Peterson J. L., Luedicke J. (2013). Motivating or stigmatizing? Public perceptions of weight-related language used by health providers. Int. J. Obes.  https://www.nature.com/articles/ijo2012110

Unleash your strength and personal brand – Professional career coaching

Focusing on your inner strengths is a great way to develop and build success, especially during these uncertain times. Are you ready to unleash your strength and personal brand? We can help! Our course and personal coaching sessions serve to provide you with a basic understanding of the strengths based philosophy. The importance of a strong personal brand based on your strengths can be the key to building a successful career, improve performance and a happier and healthier way to work.

Leading from your strengths impacts you and the people around you. Discover the science of strengths and the framework of strengths based leadership, which produces better results for people and teams. Save your spot for the next course or jump right into your professional reboot coaching. Register here.

Give the Gift of Professional Development
Gallup’s research says ‘As we look to the future, we know one of the best ways to succeed is to invest in our own and others’ success. Only when we’re focusing on strengths can we start to begin again — stronger than before.’ Give yourself or someone else the gift of professional inner strengths development.  Do you know someone who’s thinking about their future and wants to invest in themselves — maybe a family member, coworker or close friend. There is power in focusing on your strengths and helping others is empowering too. We offer gift certificates – perfect for a friend or family member.

HOLIDAY BONUS OFFER – Purchase two or more counselling packages and receive a 10% discount. Must purchase by December 15, 2020. Register here.

This is the perfect session if you want to:

  • discover the power of your natural strengths
  • build your personal and professional brand
  • improve yourself to perform better
  • find a happier and healthier way to work

Join dietitian and nutrition entrepreneur Lucia Weiler to enter the future of professional development with real-time, personalized guidance.  Let’s take a virtual walk together in a positive, encouraging and motiving session that will help you discover the power of strengths and build your personal brand.

Who should attend?

This course suits the needs of participants from diverse backgrounds. Developed to support professional training and growth among early career trainees and seasoned professionals with rich and diverse experiences.

  • Individuals
  • Students
  • Educators
  • Managers
  • Leaders

Facilitator  Bio:  

Lucia is a Registered Dietitian and savvy nutrition entrepreneur.  She is a pro at facilitating online workshops that empower professionals to apply their individual strengths for professional and personal success. With over 25 years of experience as a recognized leader in food and nutrition, Lucia has witnessed first-hand the power of strengths-based leadership in helping transform individuals and teams to successfully reach their goals. Lucia is faculty at Humber College Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellness and is an active member of the Board of Directors of Dietitians of Canada. Her company Weiler Nutrition Communications Inc. helps professionals and businesses thrive to achieve their goals. More information about Lucia’s bio is available at www.weilernutrition.com

Course & Professional Coaching:

Professional Coaching Programs are open for registration

**Register for a course or start your Individualized Professional Reboot Program *

Questions? Email Lucia@WeilerNutrition.com

 

Are you ready for virtual nutrition coaching appointments? We are open and ready to help!

Are you tired of food myths and ready for a positive change? Check out our dietitians’ blogs and recipes on this website to empower your healthy eating.

And, yes HANGRY is a real word. You may have seen hangry people who are ‘bad-tempered or irritable as a result of hunger’. Kids may also get hangry when they miss a meal.

Do you have questions about good nutrition and healthy eating? Shout out to us! We offer expert personalized sessions to help you simplify eating and keep ‘hangry’ away.

Contact us directly for your individualized nutrition coaching appointments in a virtual format. You can register at this link or Email:  Lucia@WeilerNutrition.com

Follow us on Instagram / Twitter @LuciaWeilerRD   LinkedIn 

 

 

Healthy eating on a budget

We heard from people who find it challenging to eat healthy on a budget. It’s such a great question and many folks, especially students, want to eat well and struggle with where to start.  Some of you may feel that you have no choice but to buy more expensive processed foods because you believe you can’t afford good nutrition.  There are many ways you can stretch your food dollar without sacrificing your health. Here are just FIVE tips to help you get started with making the most of your food dollar and eat well.

  1. Plan your meals
    Planning menus ahead lets you buy just what you need and stay on budget. It’s also a good way to avoid wasted food and help you lower you food costs. Planning reduces the time and stress of unplanned shopping trips and last minute dilemmas ‘what’s for dinner’. Before you go shopping think about what foods you’d like to eat/prepare. Know your food budget and adjust your menus as needed.
  2. Prepare a shopping list.
    Studies show that keeping a running grocery list is a great way to stay on track – it jogs your memory, saves money at the store, saves time too. It also keeps you from buying what you don’t need. Bottom line: Write a list and STICK TO IT.
    During Covid 19 many people prefer a paper list so they don’t have to handle their phones in the grocery store. When you prepare your list organize the items you need by category to match the store layout – for example, produce for veg and fruit, dairy, meat, bakery , frozen and grocery. We created this terrific Be Well Efficient shopping list that you can download from our website to help create your shopping list. Clicking on this link and then the image for your copy of the Be Well! Efficient Grocery Shopping List by L.Weiler RD
  3. Stock up on healthy staples that are on sale.
    Check for grocery store deals. Look for healthy food items on sale – fresh or frozen vegetables, fruit, canned beans, canned fish and meats and poultry. Dried foods are also budget friendly like dried beans, pasta, rice and oatmeal & they keep for a long time. If you like quiona buy it on SALE. Take advantage of local / seasonal produce. The price may be lower depending on where you shop. Fruits and vegetables are frozen at their peak of freshness so they are just as nutritious as fresh. You can easily add frozen or canned veggies to main dishes like casseroles and stews. You can also use frozen fruits in oatmeal, yogurt, baking and smoothies. Great choices include any dark green or orange like edamame (which are soybeans that boost protein content), peas and carrots or dark coloured berries.
  4. Cook once eat twice.
    Plan meals to make more than what you need today and enjoy the leftovers in another meal the next day. Cook extra whole grains like quinoa or barley for dinner and make a salad bowl recipe for lunch. If you eat meat and find lean cuts on sale consider buying a bit extra, roasting it and then incorporate it into another meal later. Look for recipes from Registered Dietitians that give you tips for using leftovers in your next meal.
  5. Store food properly
    Which uneaten food do you throw out most often?  Did you know that the most wasted foods in Canadian households are vegetables (30%), fruit (15%), and leftovers (13%) of total waste. So if you toss vegetables and fruit or leftovers in the trash then you’re like many Canadians. By eating the food you buy and storing it properly you will save money and reduce waste. If you find it challenging to be mindful of food storage here are some tips you could consider:
    • Butternut squash and sweet potatoes are excellent sources of the antioxidant beta carotene. They’ll last for at least two weeks.
    • Leafy greens tend to wilt within a week. So, shop and plan your menu accordingly.
    • Apples spoil 10 times faster in the fruit bowl than in the fridge.
    • Potatoes like a cool, dark spot so they don’t soften and sprout.
    • Keep cooked food in the fridge for 3-4 days and if you can’t eat it, freeze it for later use.

Visit our website for more tips and insights. Follow us on IG! @LuciaWeilerRD @Nutrition4NonNutritionists

Pivot to Positive Word Power

Did you know that a single negative word can increase fear and stress in the brain, while positive words promote brain function? Using positive words improves people’s mood both at home and at work. This is true in ordinary times and imagine the increased impact during a pandemic. Deliberately choosing positive language takes energy and awareness but it’s worth in it the long run. Consider how you can start ditching words like no, not, can’t won’t in your writing or when speaking with others. Recognize negative words like “unfortunately,” “impossible” and “problems” as flags and look for ways to revise.  It took me a long time and I’m still working on it. With that in mind, here are some negative words and phrases that are used often along with positive alternatives. Try leading by example and choose positivity to help overcome the negativity of these uncharted times.

 

How to Turn 10 Everyday Phrases

From NEGATIVE

 To POSITIVE

Don’t hesitate to call Please call
Don’t forget Remember
I’m not available on.. I can meet at…
Why not? Sounds good
I can’t hear you Can you speak louder / more clearly
It’s not hard to do You can do hard things
Not a problem You are welcome
I can’t talk now Can I talk to you later?
I won’t buy that Instead of that, what if we….
Don’t get upset I understand you feel  that way…