5 learnings from the Food and Nutrition Forum at The Royal Winter Fair

Lucia at royal 2018

Do you love food and care about how it’s grown, handled and brought to market? We do! As part of staying on top of emerging trends and new research we joined experts in food and nutrition to engage in conversation at the Royal Winter Fair Food and Nutrition Forum. As a Registered Dietitian, Lucia was invited to welcome delegates to a day of learning, getting ‘agricultured’ and celebrating the power of farming, food and nutrition. Inspiring speakers included professors, farmers, authors, dietitians and home economists. Working hand in hand, our passion for wellness and good food united us all!

Here are 5 top learnings from the sessions:

1. Farmers feed Cities
An amazing panel of 3 women farmers shared about their lives and the challenges they face in working on their farms of grain, eggs & beef. Taking care of their land and livestock is a passion and a profession. Their stories showed how deeply they care about the work they do, and how much environmental stewardship matters to each of them. Thank you Jenn Doleman, Tonya Havercamp and Sandra Vos for being the farmers who feed cities!

2. Taking care of the planet
Biodiversity & food production are deeply connected. Dr. Christian Artuso studies grassland birds and found that an important way to preserve their biodiversity is linked to cattle farming. His Grassland Bird studies are part of an award winning conservation movement in South America.

3. Teach Food and Nutrition to Students
Food and nutrition know-how are life skills with significant short and long term benefits. Although healthy lifestyle is a trend, it’s evident that many of today’s young Canadians lack even the most basic food preparation skills. Let’s give kids the best chance possible to nourish their bodies. An important consideration is expanding high school curriculum to include some mandatory food education. The Ontario Home Economics Association (OHEA) calls on the Government of Ontario to make at least one food & nutrition course compulsory. To support this petition or for more information visit www.food-literacy.ca

4. Translating the science – how to spot the fake news and alternative food facts.
Bestselling Author, Dr Joe Schwarcz shared stories of science misuse. We were reminded that correlation is an easy sway for the scientifically challenged consumer and it does NOT mean cause and effect. His latest book, A Feast of Science is an entertaining read of fact vs fiction. To help you navigate through fake nutrition news reach out to your nearest Registered Dietitian, the experts who can translate the science of nutrition and help you unlock food’s potential to support healthy living.

5. What’s next?
Let’s keep the farm to table conversations going! The more we know about where our food comes from, how it’s grown and handled the more grounded we will be. We also love sharing credible insights and resources! Check out our blogs and writing at  and Contact us about your questions on the power of food and its connection to health.

October 2018 is Workplace Wellness Month!

dietitian saves $99 2018      advice from RD's 2018

Did you know that Registered Dietitians are spearheading initiatives to improve the health of Canadians?  Research shows that every $1 invested in nutrition interventions can save the health care system up to $99 (Dietitians of Canada). We encourage you to increase access to dietitians in your workplace for better health, better care and better value. We can show you how!

productivityAsk a Dietitian about healthy habits that work

  • Keep up your energy to stay focused and meet your deadlines
  • Boost your concentration and productivity
  • Protect yourself from chronic health problems such as heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and even dental disease. 

Your Workplace Wellness Programs (WWP) are critical to help ensure employees have access to health promotion support that’s tailored to your work environments. RDs [Registered Dietitians] are an important source of credible, evidence based nutrition information that promotes health and wellness and the prevention and management of disease. Does your workplace wellness include this valuable healthcare practitioner? RDs are well governed and held accountable to the highest standards in their practice to translate the science of nutrition and deliver reliable, life changing advice.

Workplace wellness and nutrition programs are an investment in your employees’ health and well-being! Advice from RDs can help reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke by 80%, diabetes by 60% and cancer by 40%. Work with us as your RDs to help you unlock the power of food and shape your healthy eating habits. We can help you build a workplace nutrition program and offer engaging, interactive seminars that will leave a lasting impression and inspire you towards your best health!

Contact us to get started! Book us for your next team meeting or wellness event and save 20%.
Promo Code: N4NN Workplace Wellness info@NutritionForNonNutritionists.com  Lucia@WeilerNutrition.com

 

How to Build a Healthy Sandwich

sandwich n4nn

You are the builder of your healthy sandwich. The promises of a nutritious sandwich starts by choosing the right bread and fillings. Begin with a base of whole grain bread. Add a healthy source of protein (but not too much of it), loads of crunchy vegetables or fruit and a savoury sauce that’s filled with zip but not sodium. From top to bottom, here are our tips for making your healthy sandwich.

Bread

  • Switch out white bread for a more nutritious whole grain option.
  • Look for bread that lists whole grain as the first ingredient and has at least two grams of fibre per slice.
  • Think beyond bread… Try bagels, buns, pita, tortillas or naan. All come in whole grain versions. Read ingredient lists to be sure and look for “whole grain” as the first words on the ingredient

Protein

Whether you stack your sandwich with meat, cheese, egg salad, it’s important to have a source of protein between the bread.  Below are a few ideas.

Meat

  • Offer a variety of lean meats e.g. roasted beef, pulled pork, grilled turkey or barbecued chicken.
  • Consider deli meats as a once in a while treat only. Read the ingredient list and choose ones that do not include “nitrites.” Use the Nutrition Facts panel to compare and choose deli meat with the lowest sodium and fat content.

Cheese

  • Look at the % Milk Fat (%M.F.) content. Buy reduced fat or lower fat cheeses with less than 20% M.F. To limit sodium, choose fresh instead of processed cheese.

Meat alternatives

  • When mashing egg, salmon or tuna, cut back on full-fat mayonnaise. Use light mayo or low–fat yogurt instead.
  • Try something new! Beans, nuts and seeds make nutritious sandwich fillings. Use edamame or lentils to stuff a pita. Blend chickpeas with garlic and tahini to create a chunky hummus. In addition to peanut butter, offer almond, hazelnut or cashew butter. If allergies are a concern, offer soy nut or sunflower seed butter.

Vegetable and Fruit Toppings

 Build the health value of your sandwich with lots of veggies and fruit. Include at least two veggies or fruit in every sandwich or as a side accompaniment to the sandwich. Vegetables and fruit provide essential vitamins, minerals, fibre, and are low in calories. Beyond lettuce and tomato, these toppings provide a unique twist:

  • Red pepper and cucumber rings
  • Shredded carrots or beets
  • Kale, arugula or baby spinach
  • Grilled zucchini, eggplant, pineapple or peaches
  • Fruit is great on sandwiches too – try mango salsa or sliced apples
  • Fresh herbs like basil, parsley and coriander add a burst of flavour.

Sandwich spreads

  • Skip butter and choose avocado or basil pesto. It is high in heart-healthy monounsaturated fats and adds rich flavour
  • Low fat mayonnaise, oil-based vinaigrettes and non-hydrogenated margarine also contain healthy fats. Be aware that with any of these options, the calories and fat add up quickly. Use only a little– no more than 1-2 teaspoons per sandwich.
  • Ketchup, salsa and mustard are lower calorie, fat-free options. However they may be high in sodium. Limit your serving size to 1-2 teaspoons per sandwich.
  • Try wasabi (Japanese mustard) or horseradish if you like it hot – they have less sodium than other spreads.

For more information and healthy sandwich recipes please contact us!

Reference: Unlock Food.ca – Expert Guidance, Everyday Eating by Dietitians of Canada (2017)

Call to action: protecting people with allergies

Food Allergy Canada 2018-07-15_16-41-56

Concerned about food allergy? It can be deadly and is something we all need to be more aware of. Students with food allergies are particularly vulnerable as they start college or university because of the big transition to more independent eating and living.

Food Allergy Canada just released a reference guide focusing on the challenges and recommended best practices for managing food allergies in post-secondary institutions. Protecting people with food allergies is a big responsibility in every food environment.

In our work as dietitians and food safety trainers, we know managing food allergies is a top priority for foodservice professionals who dedicate much time and effort to supporting people who live with food allergies. Based on our experience and the terrific insights in the Food Allergy Canada report, here are three key actions for foodservice operators to help reduce food allergy risks:

  1. Educate and Train
  • Help your team understand the seriousness of food allergies – they can be deadly – and what can be done to reduce the risks.
  • Offer allergy related training and in-service updates to foodservice staff and community leaders.
  • Work with a qualified professional, such as a Registered Dietitian to provide certified continuing education to your team.
  1. Create a Food Allergy Policy & Management System
  • Create leadership driven policies and procedures help guide the actions of all individuals to ensure the well-being of everyone with a food allergy / sensitivity.
  • Involve cross functional teams including people / students with a food allergy.
  • Build a food-allergen aware culture to significantly reduce the risks.
  1. Offer Allergen-Safe Food choices
  • AVOIDING the specific foods responsible is the BEST way to prevent allergic reactions.
  • Always READ the Ingredients list from beginning to end. Food labelling for pre-packaged food is regulated in Canada. If a priority food allergen, gluten source or added sulphite is an ingredient or part of an ingredient of a food it must be listed either in the ingredient list OR in a “Contains” statement that follows the list. When you review food labels for allergens “Triple Check” and read the label three times: 1. Before buying, 2. Before putting away, 3. Before serving.[1] Encourage students to read food labels too!
  • Managing allergens in foodservice follows similar procedures as food safety. In addition to checking the Ingredients List, cross contact / cross contamination is a key focus.

For more information, check out this important resource for professionals and families.  Food Allergy Canada’s new Managing Food Allergies and Anaphylaxis: A Guide for Post-Secondary Institutions is available for download at http://foodallergycanada.ca/campusguide. Please share with your colleagues, students and campuses! Questions? Shout out to us info@NutritionForNonNutritionists.com

[1] Food Allergy Canada, Food Labelling 101 http://resources.allergyaware.ca/download/food-labelling-101.pdf

The Future of Food – Five Trends with a Big Impact

future of food bill gates notes 2018-06-01_1-08-23At the recent Food and Beverage Ontario Annual General Meeting in Toronto, we shared top trends that will have a big impact on the future of food both in retail and foodservice. Here’s Here’s a snapshot of our expert dietitian insights.

1. Eating healthier is a universal goal for all Canadians

Food that tastes great and nourishes the body rank high on Canadians’ wish list. In designing menus, especially where calories are now displayed, foodservice teams and food makers can help make the calories count for health and wellness! To unlock the potential of food, consider a perfect pairing of a chef and registered dietitian for your next menu update.

2. Demographics

Kids, millennials and seniors all have unique nutritional needs. Schools and retirement/nursing homes are also regulated for the kinds of foods they can sell. Workplace wellness is catching up with guidelines on how to achieve better eating habits that can result in more productive workforce. Have you seen the ‘sell more’ and ‘sell less’ lists? Give us a shout – we can help!

3. Plant based eating

Pant foods are the mega trend. ‘Plan based diet” is one of the top google searches by Canadians 2017! Consumers are looking for more plant based menu items in foodservice as well. Don’t make the mistake of just removing the meat from your menu! Vegetarian meals should also be well balanced and include a minimum 20g protein per meal. Registered Dietitians have the tools and tips to help chefs make the switch to balanced vegetarian menu items.

4. New food regulations influence food choices

You may wonder who reads food labels anyway. Research shows that more than 2/3 of Canadians read food labels to help them decide which foods to buy and eat. Labels also provide highly credible & prominent information on foods. The New Nutrition Facts Label and proposed new Canada’s Food Guide focus on limiting saturated fat, salt and sugars. These tools are the foundation for nutrition communication and menu development in many institutions. What’s your plan to leverage the power of the label in marketing?

5. Grand designs & food halls

Foodservice is embracing showcase exhibition food prep to capture the excitement of cooking “onstage.” Open kitchens are transparent and underscore the consumers’ desire for fresh food. New grocery stores and food halls delight consumers with a mix of hot-food stations, ‘grab’n go’ items and ‘do it yourself bowls’. The future of eating out is personalized and tech savvy.

(Image Source: GatesNotes)